Donnerstag, 22. Juni 2017

Wölkchen Washcloth

Currently, I seem to be obsessed with intarsia knitting ... but since I do not like to weave in ends (AT ALL), I try to do everything with a maximum of two skeins (or bobbins) of yarn. In the instance of this piece, I wanted to achieve a white cloud shape on blue background. And since the background is above and below as well as left and right of the white cloud, I needed to knit around the center to only have two active skeins.

Yes, I know that it would have been perfectly easy to just knit it in plain intarsia style with three bobbins of yarn (two blue, one white) in a rectangle from bottom to top. But I really (really, really) wanted to achieve this with only two of them (one blue, one white).

Since it is knitted with intarsia technique the WS of the piece looks OK. It is knitted all in garter stitch, which gives it a squishy texture. Of course, this piece can not only be used as a washcloth, but also as a potholder or coaster.


As to the name, Wölkchen is the german word for a small cloud or a puff of a cloud.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.






Materials
  • a total of 30 grams of Sports or DK weight yarn in two colors (however, you can use other yarn weights as well)
  • 3.5mm needles (or the needles that the yarn calls for)
  • scrap yarn and crochet hook for provisional CO
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends 

Techniques & Notation
  • Throughout the pattern, the following notation is used:  C1 (k4); C2 (k10, w+t, k10); C1 (k to end) means, knit 4 stitches in C1, change to C2 and knit 10 sts, do a wrap and turn, knit 10 stitches and then change back to C1 and k to end. I.e. color is indicated before the knitting instructions for that yarn. the knitting instructions for that yarn are given in brackets after the color and color changes are indicated by a semicolon.  I.e. color is indicated before the knitting instructions for that yarn. the knitting instructions for that yarn are given in brackets after the color and color changes are indicated by a semicolon.
  • Short rows with wrap and turn (w+t) - as shown in this YouTube video by Very Pink Knits.
    Since this washcloth is knit in garter stitch, you don't have to pick up your wraps - except in two rows, i.e. the rows where the wrapping color is different from the color of the wrapped stitch. These rows are indicated in the pattern. Here's a YouTube video that shows how to pick up your wraps (also by Very Pink Knits).
  • Note: in some rows the wrap has to be made just at the color change in the row below, e.g. Ridge B11 where you knit 11 sts in C1 and the 12 stitch that is to be wrapped was knitted in C2. In this case, it's advisable to change the color (as if to knit the next stitch in the new color), wrap and turn in the new color, and then to change back. This gives nicer color edges.
  • Provisional CO: My favorite method for a provisional CO is the crochet provisional CO - it is shown in this Youtube video by New Stitch a Day.
  • Grafting in Garter Stitch: A technique to get an invisible (knitted) seam - this technique is shown in this YouTube Video by knittinghelp.com. 

Construction
The washcloth is knitted in 5 parts. It starts with a provisional CO. Then each row is a stitch shorter than the last one, One part ends, when the row is only 1 stitch long - then the next part begins and each row is one stitch longer than the last one until all stitches are knitted and we've sucessfully knitted around a corner. Then the row length is getting shorter again for the next corner. 
After knitting around four corners and the two sides (CO and last row) are grafted in garter stitch.



Instructions

Part A
With scrap yarn provisionally CO 18 sts
Row 0: C2 (k4), C1 (k14)
Ridge A1: C1 (k13); C2 (k4, w+t, k4); C1 (k13)
Ridge A2: C1 (k12); C2 (k4, w+t, k4); C1 (k12)
Ridge A3: C1 (k11); C2 (k4, w+t, k4); C1 (k11)
Ridge A4: C1 (k11); C2 (k3, w+t, k3); C1 (k11)
Ridge A5: C1 (k11); C2 (k2, w+t, k2); C1 (k11)
Ridge A6: C1 (k11); C2 (k1, w+t, k1); C1 (k11)
Ridge A7: C1 (k11, w+t, k11)
Ridge A8: C1 (k10, w+t, k10)
Ridge A9: C1 (k9, w+t, k9)
Ridge A10: C1 (k8, w+t, k8)
Ridge A11: C1 (k7, w+t, k7)
Ridge A12: C1 (k6, w+t, k6)
Ridge A13: C1 (k5, w+t, k5)
Ridge A14: C1 (k4, w+t, k4)
Ridge A15: C1 (k3, w+t, k3)
Ridge A16: C1 (k2, w+t, k2)
Ridge A17: C1 (k1, w+t, k1)



Part B
Ridge B1: C1 (k1, w+t, k1)
Ridge B2: C1 (k2, w+t, k2)
Ridge B3: C1 (k3, w+t, k3)
Ridge B4: C1 (k4, w+t, k4)
Ridge B5: C1 (k5, w+t, k5)
Ridge B6: C1 (k6, w+t, k6)
Ridge B7: C1 (k7, w+t, k7)
Ridge B8: C1 (k8, w+t, k8)
Ridge B9: C1 (k9, w+t, k9)
Ridge B10: C1 (k10, w+t, k10)
Ridge B11: C1 (k11, w+t, k11)
Rigde B12: C1 (k11); C2 (k1, w+t, k1); C1 (k11)
Rigde B13: C1 (k10); C2 (k3, w+t, k3); C1 (k10)
Rigde B14: C1 (k10); C2 (k4, w+t, k4); C1 (k10)
Rigde B15: C1 (k9); C2 (k6, w+t, k6); C1 (k9)
Rigde B16: C1 (k9); C2 (k7, w+t, k7); C1 (k9)
Rigde B17: C1 (k8); C2 (k9, w+t, k9); C1 (k8)
Rigde B18: C1 (k7); C2 (k11, turn, k11); C1 (k7)
Rigde B19: C1 (k5); C2 (k12, w+t, k12); C1 (k5)
Rigde B20: C1 (k4); C2 (k12, w+t, k12); C1 (k4)
Rigde B21: C1 (k4); C2 (k11, w+t, k11); C1 (k4)
Rigde B22: C1 (k4); C2 (k10, w+t, k10); C1 (k4)
Rigde B23: C1 (k5); C2 (k8, w+t, k8); C1 (k5)
Rigde B24: C1 (k5); C2 (k7, w+t, k7); C1 (k5)
Rigde B25: C1 (k6); C2 (k5, w+t, k5); C1 (k6)
Rigde B26: C1 (k7); C2 (k3, w+t, k3); C1 (k7)
Rigde B27: C1 (k8); C2 (k1, w+t, k1); C1 (k8)
Ridge B28: C1 (k8, w+t, k8)
Ridge B29: C1 (k7, w+t, k7)
Ridge B30: C1 (k6, w+t, k6)
Ridge B31: C1 (k5, w+t, k5)
Ridge B32: C1 (k4, w+t, k4)
Ridge B33: C1 (k3, w+t, k3)
Ridge B34: C1 (k2, w+t, k2)
Ridge B35: C1 (k1, w+t, k1)


Part C
Ridge C1: C1 (k1, w+t, k1)
Ridge C2: C1 (k2, w+t, k2)
Ridge C3: C1 (k3, w+t, k3)
Ridge C4: C1 (k4, w+t, k4)
Ridge C5: C1 (k5, w+t, k5)
Ridge C6: C1 (k6, w+t, k6)
Ridge C7: C1 (k7, w+t, k7)
Ridge C8: C1 (k8, w+t, k8)
Rigde C9: C1 (k8); C2 (k1, w+t, k1); C1 (k8)
Rigde C10: C1 (k8); C2 (k2, w+t, k2); C1 (k8)
Rigde C11: C1 (k8); C2 (k3, w+t, k3); C1 (k8)
Rigde C12: C1 (k9); C2 (k3, w+t, k3); C1 (k9)
Rigde C13: C1 (k10); C2 (k3, w+t, k3); C1 (k10)
Rigde C14: C1 (k11); C2 (k3, w+t, k3); C1 (k11)
Rigde C15: C1 (k10); C2 (k5, w+t, k5); C1 (k10)
Rigde C16: C1 (k9); C2 (k7, w+t, k7); C1 (k9)
Rigde C17: C1 (k9); C2 (k8, w+t, k8); C1 (k9)
Rigde C18: C1 (k9); C2 (k9, turn, k9); C1 (k9)
Rigde C19: C1 (k8); C2 (k9, w+t, k9); C1 (k8)
Rigde C20: C1 (k8); C2 (k8, w+t, k8); C1 (k8)
Rigde C21: C1 (k7); C2 (k8, w+t, k8); C1 (k7)
Rigde C22: C1 (k7); C2 (k7, w+t, k7); C1 (k7)
Rigde C23: C1 (k7); C2 (k6, w+t, k6); C1 (k7)
Rigde C24: C1 (k7); C2 (k5, w+t, k5); C1 (k7)
Rigde C25: C1 (k7); C2 (k4, w+t, k4); C1 (k7)
Rigde C26: C1 (k8); C2 (k2, w+t, k2); C1 (k8)
Rigde C27: C1 (k8); C2 (k1, w+t, k1); C1 (k8)
Ridge C28: C1 (k8, w+t, k8)
Ridge C29: C1 (k7, w+t, k7)
Ridge C30: C1 (k6, w+t, k6)
Ridge C31: C1 (k5, w+t, k5)
Ridge C32: C1 (k4, w+t, k4)
Ridge C33: C1 (k3, w+t, k3)
Ridge C34: C1 (k2, w+t, k2)
Ridge C35: C1 (k1, w+t, k1)

Part D
Ridge D1: C1 (k1, w+t, k1)
Ridge D2: C1 (k2, w+t, k2)
Ridge D3: C1 (k3, w+t, k3)
Ridge D4: C1 (k4, w+t, k4)
Ridge D5: C1 (k5, w+t, k5)
Ridge D6: C1 (k6, w+t, k6)
Ridge D7: C1 (k7, w+t, k7)
Ridge D8: C1 (k8, w+t, k8)
Rigde D9: C1 (k7); C2 (k2, w+t, k2); C1 (k7)
Rigde D10: C1 (k6); C2 (k4, w+t, k4); C1 (k6)
Rigde D11: C1 (k5); C2 (k6, w+t, k6); C1 (k5)
Rigde D12: C1 (k5); C2 (k7, w+t, k7); C1 (k5)
Rigde D13: C1 (k4); C2 (k9, w+t, k9); C1 (k4)
Rigde D14: C1 (k4); C2 (k10, w+t, k10); C1 (k4)
Rigde D15: C1 (k3); C2 (k12, w+t, k12); C1 (k3)
Rigde D16: C1 (k3); C2 (k13, w+t, k13); C1 (k3)
Rigde D17: C1 (k3); C2 (k14, w+t, k14); C1 (k3)
Rigde D18: C1 (k4); C2 (k14, turn, k14); C1 (k4)
Rigde D19: C1 (k5); C2 (k12, w+t, k12); C1 (k5)
Rigde D20: C1 (k7); C2 (k9, w+t, k9); C1 (k7)
Rigde D21: C1 (k8); C2 (k7, w+t, k7); C1 (k8)
Rigde D22: C1 (k8); C2 (k6, w+t, k6); C1 (k8)
Rigde D23: C1 (k9); C2 (k4, w+t, k4); C1 (k9)
Rigde D24: C1 (k9); C2 (k3, w+t, k3); C1 (k9)
Rigde D25: C1 (k10); C2 (k1, w+t, k1); C1 (k10)
Ridge D26: C1 (k10, w+t, k10)
Ridge D27: C1 (k9, w+t, k9)
Ridge D28: C1 (k8, w+t, k8)
Ridge D29: C1 (k7, w+t, k7)
Ridge D30: C1 (k6, w+t, k6)
Ridge D31: C1 (k5, w+t, k5)
Ridge D32: C1 (k4, w+t, k4)
Ridge D33: C1 (k3, w+t, k3)
Ridge D34: C1 (k2, w+t, k2)
Ridge D35: C1 (k1, w+t, k1)

Part E
Ridge E1: C1 (k1, w+t, k1)
Ridge E2: C1 (k2, w+t, k2)
Ridge E3: C1 (k3, w+t, k3)
Ridge E4: C1 (k4, w+t, k4)
Ridge E5: C1 (k5, w+t, k5)
Ridge E6: C1 (k6, w+t, k6)
Ridge E7: C1 (k7, w+t, k7)
Ridge E8: C1 (k8, w+t, k8)
Ridge E9: C1 (k9, w+t, k9)
Ridge E10: C1 (k10, w+t, k10)
Rigde E11: C1 (k9); C2 (k2, w+t, k2); C1 (k9)
Rigde E12: C1 (k7); C2 (k5, w+t, k5); C1 (k7)
Rigde E13: C1 (k6); C2 (k7, w+t, k7); C1 (k6)
Rigde E14: C1 (k6); C2 (k8, w+t, k8); C1 (k6)
Rigde E15: C1 (k6); C2 (k9, w+t, k9); C1 (k6)
Rigde E16: C1 (k8); C2 (k8, w+t, k8); C1 (k8)
Rigde E17: C1 (k11); C2 (k6, w+t, k6); C1 (k11)

Graft in garter stitch: 14 sts in C1 (blue) and 4 sts in C2 (white)

Finishing
After grafting there is still a small hole in the middle of the piece - you can sew this closed with your yarn tail. Sew in ends afterwards.




Chart
When I designed this piece I worked from a piece of squared paper with the cloud drawn on. So, if you too, prefer to work from a chart, here's one. The numbers in front of the ridge indicate the number of stitches per color - the blue number for the C1 stitches and the black number for the C2 stitches. To make the counting a bit easier, there are dotted pink lines after every 5 stitches.

Wölkchen Washcloth - free knitting pattern by Knitting and so on
Wölkchen Washcloth Chart - click on picture to enlarge or here for a PDF of the chart

Dienstag, 20. Juni 2017

Pencil Holders - Knitter's Version

I like my stuff to state - loud and clear - that I am a knitter. That's why I sometimes decorate items in my home with pieces of my knitting. This was also the case with these pencil holders. In true recycling fashion I used old tin cans as basis - I painted them, knitted a few small pieces using old yarn leftovers to fit them and glued the knitting to the cans. The first ones were knitted in random lace style which creates an organic look.
I really love how they turned out. The finished pieces look very stylish on your desk ... and of course they can be used to hold some of your knitting equipment as well :)


Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.



Materials
  • old tin cans or old glass jars
  • acryllic paint
  • yarn (leftovers?)
  • knitting needles appropriate for the yarn
  • craft glue

Techniques ...
... if you like the random lace look of the purple containers
Alternatively, you can just knit your piece with your preferred CO and BO and in any stitch pattern you like (e.g. plain garter stitch) and sew the edges together.


How-To
  • Clean containers and remove labels (this blogpost by The Creek Line House explains how to do this without residue).
  • Paint them with acryllic paint in your favorite color - I painted two coats on the outside and one on the inside.
  • Measure your containers (height and circumference) and knit a piece that fits these measurements. I did plain garter stitch stripes (the tins painted white) and a few random lace pieces (the tins painted purple). I have written a tutorial on how to knit random lace a few years ago - you can find it here.
  • If you've knitted a lace piece (random or otherwise), be sure to block it to size. It will look much nicer than before. I you've knitted a different stitch pattern, you may skip the blocking part - I did not block the garter stitch pieces.
  • If you haven't grafted your piece, sew ends together to form a tube, pull it over your container and glue the knitted piece to your container. Let the glue dry and you're done.


Dienstag, 6. Juni 2017

She sells seashells on the sea shore - Seashell Coasters

Over where I live it's recently been quite hot and I was in the mood for a little project with a summery, beachy holiday feeling. That's why I tried to knit a few coasters in a seashell shape. It took me a while to get the shape right, but I'm quite happy with them. They are lovely to put under a cool drink in summer. Furthermore, as a very small piece they are great to practice new knitting techniques - in this case short rows and intarsia.


Actually, the inspiration for the tongue twister "She sells seashells on the sea shore" in the title was a person: Mary Anning, an English fossil collector in the 19th century who found and correctly identified quite a few Jurassic fossils, but never received much credit in her lifetime.

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.





Materials/Size
  • per coaster I used less than 10 grams of DK weight cotton, but other yarn weights will work as well
  • I used 3mm dpns
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends
With the yarn I used, the coasters were about 11 cm high and 17 cm wide (at their widest point).



Techniques & Notation
  • Long-Tail Cast On: As shown in this YouTube video by Studio Knit
  • Intarsia: Changing colors with the intarsia technique - as shown in this YouTube video by knitwithpat; or this YouTube video by Francoise Danoy.
    Please note that for this pattern the last 2 stitches in CC of a row (when they are reached after using the MC - which only happens 6 times) are knitted with the tail of that was left over by the long tail CO. That way,  it is not necessary to use a 2nd skein or bobbin in CC - and it also avoids two more ends to weave in :) See photo below.
  • Short Rows (t+p): Short rows are one of my favorite knitting techniques because they not only allow you to shape your knitting but also to created interesting graphical pattern. There are several techniques for short rows – and it’s a matter of taste which one you prefer. I’ve recently learned a technique called German short rows: when you turn, bring yarn to the front and pull it back so that a sort of double-stitch is created, then knit back as usual - when you have to knit the double-stitch, be careful to knit it as one stitch (see also this YouTube video); this method has the advantage the no picking up of stitches is necessary. In the pattern, this stitch will be called t+p (turn and pull).
    When the pattern says, t+p it means that the stitch you just knitted should be pulled, i.e. you don't have to knit another stitch to t+p.
  • Throughout the pattern, the following notation will be used: "CC (k2); MC (k13, t+p, k12); CC(k2) 13, w+t, k13)"   means "knit 2 sts with CC; change to MC and knit 13, do a turn an pull, knit 12 stitches with MC; change back to CC and knit the 2 stitches 
  • CCtail (k2, turn, sl1, k1) means "with the tail of CC knit 2 stitches, turn, sl1 and k1". In order to avoid a second skein or bobbin (and two more ends to weave in). You're asked to leave a tail of your CO and knit with it.


Instructions

CO21 in CC with long tail CO, but leave a tail of at least 80 cm - this tail will be used to knit the CC edge stitches on this side of the piece.
Setup Row: k all sts
Ridge 1: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k17); CCtail (k2, turn, sl1, k1); MC (k17); CC (k2)
Ridge 2: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k12, t+p, k11); CC (k2)
Ridge 3: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k8, t+p, k7); CC (k2)
Ridge 4: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k1, kbf, k1 t+p, k3); CC (k2)
Ridge 5: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k7, t+p, k6); CC (k2)
Ridge 6: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k11, t+p, k10); CC (k2)
Ridge 7: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k15, t+p, k14); CC (k2)
Ridge 8: CC (sl1, k21, turn, sl1, k21)
Ridge 9: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k18); CCtail (k2, turn, sl1, k1); MC (k18); CC (k2)
Ridge 10: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k13, t+p, k12); CC (k2)
Ridge 11: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k9, t+p, k8); CC (k2)
Ridge 12: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k1, kfb, k2, t+p, k5); CC (k2)
Ridge 13: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k8, t+p, k7); CC (k2)
Ridge 14: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k12, t+p, k11); CC (k2)
Ridge 15: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k16, t+p, k15); CC (k2)
Ridge 16: CC (sl1, k22, turn, sl1, k22)
Ridge 17: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k19); CCtail (k2, turn, sl1, k1); MC (k19); CC (k2)
Ridge 18: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k1, kfb, k10, t+p, k12); CC (k2)
Ridge 19: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k11, t+p, k10); CC (k2)
Ridge 20: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k7, t+p, k6); CC (k2)
Ridge 21: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k5, t+p, k4); CC (k2)
Ridge 22: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k9, t+p, k8); CC (k2)
Ridge 23: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k13, t+p, k12); CC (k2)
Ridge 24: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k1, ssk, k12, t+p, k13); CC (k2)
Ridge 25: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k19); CCtail (k2, turn, sl1, k1); MC (k19); CC (k2)
Ridge 26: CC (sl1, k22, turn, sl1, k22)
Ridge 27: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k16, t+p, k15); CC (k2)
Ridge 28: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k12, t+p, k11); CC (k2)
Ridge 29: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k8, t+p, k7); CC (k2)
Ridge 30: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k1, ssk, k3, t+p, k4); CC (k2)
Ridge 31: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k9, t+p, k8); CC (k2)
Ridge 32: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k13, t+p, k12); CC (k2)
Ridge 33: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k18); CCtail (k2, turn, sl1, k1); MC (k18); CC (k2)
Ridge 34: CC (sl1, k21, turn, sl1, k21)
Ridge 35: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k15, t+p, k14); CC (k2)
Ridge 36: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k11, t+p, k10); CC (k2)
Ridge 37: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k7, t+p, k6); CC (k2)
Ridge 38: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k1, ssk, k2, t+p, k3); CC (k2)
Ridge 39: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k8, t+p, k7); CC (k2)
Ridge 40: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k12, t+p, k11); CC (k2)
Ridge 41: CC (sl1, k1); MC (k17); CCtail (k2, turn, sl1, k1); MC (k17); CC (k2)
Ridge 42: CC (sl1, k to end, turn; bind off)



Chart

If you prefer to work from a chart, here's one. The numbers in front of the ridge indicate the number of stitches per color - the green number for the CC stitches and the black number for the MC stitches.
The pink dotted line are only there to help you counting. They have a distance of 5 stitches and start at the end of the row - after the last two CC color end stitches.





The cake in this picture is a chocolate babka - I used this recipe (in German)


Donnerstag, 1. Juni 2017

Xtreme Slip Stitches

I first started to get the idea for this pattern when I looked at planned pooling projects (here's an example of a planned pooling project, and another example on YouTube)  - and really wanted to create something that looked similar with a sort of Argyle effect but
  • without going through the process of measuring a specific kind of yarn, 
  • without being forced to knit to a calculated number of stitches per row and 
  • without being dependent on a certain kind of yarn.
That's why I decided to do something with solid colors. The piece is knitted all in garter stitch, short row ridges in contrast colors are used to create this pattern. To get to the point where you start the short row, you have to slip a number of stitches without knitting them. I can imagine that you also can achieve a similar effect it with intarsia, but you'd need more skeins (bobbins) for this - up to 3 of the main color.


By the way, this is my hundredth (100th!) pattern on Ravelry! I must admit that I'm rather proud ...




Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.




Materials
  • a total of 160 grams of Sports weight yarn in three colors - called main color (MC, light orange in the photos - about 110 grams), contrast color 1 (CC1, white in the photos - about 25 grams) and contrast color 2 (CC2, pink in the photos - also about 25 grams)
  • 4mm knitting needles
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends

Gauge and Size

When knitting the piece you will have unnevenness due to the number of rows at certain points. This will even out in the end - however, after blocking some parts will be more stretched than others. That's why I chose to give you gauge with an unblocked piece: Unblocked and knitted in garter stitch 19 stitches gave 10 cm in width and 18 ridges (i.e. 36 rows) gave 10 cm in length.
The finished piece is 82 cm long ("elbow-to-elbow") and 38 cm wide (i.e. has a circumference of 38 cm at the arms).
If you have different gauge or a want to knit another size, there are some suggestions how to change the size at the end of the pattern.



Techniques and Notation
  • Slipping stitches purlwise: If the pattern says slip 30 sts (or sl30 for short), just slip these 30 sts purlwise (i.e. don't turn them). 
  • Short rows with Wrap and Turn (w+t): as shown in this YouTube video by Very Pink Knits. Since the wraps are in a different color than the wrapped stitch, the wraps should be picked up. Here's a YouTube video that shows how to pick up your wraps (also by Very Pink Knits).
  • Wrap and Slip Front Stitch (w+sfs): Bring the new working yarn to front (see photo 1). Slip the next stitch as if to knit (photo 2). And bring the yarn working yarn to back (photo 3) and continue knitting (photo 4). This is used to attach the new working yarn of a new color to the stitch in front. It's not a wrap before a turn, but a wrap before you start knitting in this direction.
  • In the row above this w+sfs wrap, this stitch is knitted through the back loop as follows: pick up the wrap with the right hand needle (photo 1) and place it on the left hand needle (photo 2); then knit it through the back loop (photo 3). In the instructions the stitch that was wrapped like this will be referrred to as wfs-stitch.

Instructions

Short Version

Some explanations:
  • The piece is knitted in garter stitch ridges - one ridge is knitted in the main color, followed by a short row ridge in CC1, a ridge in MC and a short row ridge in CC2. 
  • The contrast color short rows always move 2 stitches from one use of the color to the next:
    • During the first half of the pattern CC1 starts at the start of the row and moves 2 stitches further towards the end, 
    • CC2 starts at the end of the row and then moves 2 stitches further towards the beginning of the row
    • During the second half of the pattern the contrast colors "move" in opposite directions.
  • The yarn in contrast colors is carried up on the WS of the pattern. Since the distance between the starting points of the short rows is usually 2 stitches and one ridge, the floats are not too long.

CO 70 in MC

Ridge 1 (MC): sl1, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 2 (CC1): sl1, k25, w+t, k 26
Ridge 3 (MC): sl1, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 4 (CC2): sl to 27 sts before end, w+sfs, k26, turn, sl1, k25, sl to end
Ridge 5 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 6: (CC1): sl to the stitch where you started CC1 the last time (i.e. 4 ridges before), slip one more stitch, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl to end
Ridge 7 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 8 (CC2): sl to 3 sts before the stitch where you started CC2 the last time (4 ridges before), w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl to end
Repeat ridges 5 to 8 until ridge 8 starts without slip stitches (i.e. you start knitting with CC2 at the beginning of the row).

Now you nearly knit the same sequence backwards, i.e.
Ridge 1b (MC): sl1, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 2b (CC1): sl to 27 sts before end, w+sfs, k26, turn, sl1, k25, sl to end
Ridge 3b (MC): sl1, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 4b (CC2): sl1, k25, w+t, k 26
Ridge 5b (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 6b (CC1): sl to 3 sts before the stitch where you started CC1 the last time (4 ridges before), w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl to end
Ridge 7b (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 8b (CC2): sl to the stitch where you started CC2 the last time (i.e. 4 ridges before), slip one more stitch, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl to end
Repeat ridges 5 to 8 until ridge 8 starts without slip stitches (i.e. you start knitting with CC1 at the beginning of the row).

End with an MC ridge and BO.
Weave in ends an block.
Fold lengthwise and seam the arms.



Long Version 

CO 70 in MC
Ridge 1 (MC): sl1, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 2 (CC1): sl1, k25, w+t, k 26
Ridge 3 (MC): sl1, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 4 (CC2): sl43, w+sfs, k26 (i.e. k to end), turn, sl1, k25, sl44
Ridge 5 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 6: (CC1): sl1, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl2
Ridge 7 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 8 (CC2): sl41, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl42
Ridge 9 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 10 (CC1): sl3, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl4
Ridge 11 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 12 (CC2): sl39, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl40
Ridge 13 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 14 (CC1): sl5, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl6
Ridge 15 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 16 (CC2): sl37, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl38
Ridge 17 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 18 (CC1): sl7, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl8
Ridge 19 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 20 (CC2): sl35, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl36
Ridge 21 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 22 (CC1): sl9, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl10
Ridge 23 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 24 (CC2): sl33, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl34
Ridge 25 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 26 (CC1): sl11, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl12
Ridge 27 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 28 (CC2): sl31, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl32
Ridge 29 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 30 (CC1): sl13, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl14
Ridge 31 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 32 (CC2): sl29, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl30
Ridge 33 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 34 (CC1): sl15, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl16
Ridge 35 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 36 (CC2): sl27, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl28
Ridge 37 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 38 (CC1): sl17, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl18
Ridge 39 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 40 (CC2): sl25, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl26
Ridge 41 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 42 (CC1): sl19, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl20
Ridge 43 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 44 (CC2): sl23, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl24
Ridge 45 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 46 (CC1): sl21, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl22
Ridge 47 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 48 (CC2): sl21, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl22
Ridge 49 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 50 (CC1): sl23, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl24
Ridge 51 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 52 (CC2): sl19, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl20
Ridge 53 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 54 (CC1): sl25, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl26
Ridge 55 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 56 (CC2): sl17, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl18
Ridge 57 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 58 (CC1): sl27, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl28
Ridge 59 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 60 (CC2): sl15, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl16
Ridge 61 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 58 (CC1): sl27, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl28
Ridge 59 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 60 (CC2): sl15, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl16
Ridge 61 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 62 (CC1): sl29, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl30
Ridge 63 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 64 (CC2): sl13, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl14
Ridge 65 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 66 (CC1): sl31, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl32
Ridge 67 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 68 (CC2): sl11, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl12
Ridge 69 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 70 (CC1): sl33, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl34
Ridge 71 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 72 (CC2): sl9, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl10
Ridge 73 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 74 (CC1): sl35, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl36
Ridge 75 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 76 (CC2): sl7, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl8
Ridge 77 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 78 (CC1): sl37, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl38
Ridge 79 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 80 (CC2): sl5, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl6
Ridge 81 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 82 (CC1): sl39, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl40
Ridge 83 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 84 (CC2): sl3, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl4
Ridge 85 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 82 (CC1): sl41, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl42
Ridge 83 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 84 (CC2): sl1, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl2
Ridge 85 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 86 (CC1): sl43, w+sfs, k26 (i.e. k to end), turn, sl1, k25, sl44
Ridge 87 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 88 (CC2): sl1, k25, w+t, k26 (i.e. k to end)
Ridge 89 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end

Here's how your piece should look after ridge 85.


Ridge 90 (CC1): sl41, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl42
Ridge 91 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 92 (CC2): sl1, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl2
Ridge 93 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 94 (CC1): sl39, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl40
Ridge 95 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 96 (CC2): sl3, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl4
Ridge 97 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 98 (CC1): sl37, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl38
Ridge 99 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 100 (CC2): sl5, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl6
Ridge 101 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 102 (CC1): sl35, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl36
Ridge 103 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 104 (CC2): sl7, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl8
Ridge 105 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 106 (CC1): sl33, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl34
Ridge 107 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 108 (CC2): sl9, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl10
Ridge 109 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 110 (CC1): sl31, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl32
Ridge 111 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 112 (CC2): sl11, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl12
Ridge 113 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 114 (CC1): sl29, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl30
Ridge 115 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 116 (CC2): sl13, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl14
Ridge 117 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 118 (CC1): sl27, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl28
Ridge 119 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 120 (CC2): sl15, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl16
Ridge 121 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 122 (CC1): sl25, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl26
Ridge 123 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 124 (CC2): sl17, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl18
Ridge 125 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 126 (CC1): sl23, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl24
Ridge 127 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 128 (CC2): sl19, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl20
Ridge 129 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 130 (CC1): sl21, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl22
Ridge 131 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 132 (CC2): sl21, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl22
Ridge 133 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 134 (CC1): sl19, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl20
Ridge 135 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 136 (CC2): sl23, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl24
Ridge 137 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 138 (CC1): sl17, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl18
Ridge 139 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 140 (CC2): sl25, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl26
Ridge 141 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 142 (CC1): sl15, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl16
Ridge 143 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 144 (CC2): sl27, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl28
Ridge 145 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 146 (CC1): sl13, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl14
Ridge 147 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 148 (CC2): sl29, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl30
Ridge 149 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 150 (CC1): sl11, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl12
Ridge 151 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 152 (CC2): sl31, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl32
Ridge 153 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 154 (CC1): sl9, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl10
Ridge 155 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 156 (CC2): sl33, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl34
Ridge 157 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 158 (CC1): sl7, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl8
Ridge 159 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 160 (CC2): sl35, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl36
Ridge 161 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 162 (CC1): sl5, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl6
Ridge 163 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 164 (CC2): sl37, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl38
Ridge 165 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 166 (CC1): sl3, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl4
Ridge 167 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 168 (CC2): sl39, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl40
Ridge 169 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 170: (CC1): sl1, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl2
Ridge 171 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 172 (CC2): sl41, w+sfs, k26, w+t, k26, sl42
Ridge 173 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 174 (CC1): sl1, k25, w+t, k 26
Ridge 175 (MC): sl1, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 176 (CC2): sl43, w+sfs, k26 (i.e. k to end), turn, sl1, k25, sl44
Ridge 177 (MC): sl1, k to wfs-stitch, ktbl, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end
Ridge 178 (MC): sl1, k to end, turn, sl1, k to end

Weave in ends and block! The picture below shows the piece on the blocking board.
Fold lengthwise and seam the arms.



How to Adapt the Pattern to Another the Size
As you may have noticed when reading the pattern. the contrast color short rows always move 2 stitches from one use of the color to the next.
During the first half of the pattern CC1 starts at the start of the row and moves 2 stitches further towards the end, while CC2 starts at the end of the row and then moves 2 stitches further towards the beginning of the row.
This means that the first point where you start the short row with CC2 is as far from the end as the length of the short row (in the pattern above the row is 70 sts wide - and the CC short rows are always 26 sts wide, that means the first start of the CC2 short row starts with 70-26=44 slip stitches - or rather 43 slip stitches and the 44th one is wrapped from the front).
  • So if you just want to lengthen the piece, you could chose to make the short rows shorter than 26 sts, this means you need more rows until the last short row reaches the other end of the complete row.
  • Or if you just want to widen the piece, you can chose to cast on more than 70 sts and adjust the length of the short rows, e.g. CO 80 sts and make the short rows 36 sts long. That way you still need the same number of rows as specified in the pattern. Please note that here you need to start the first short row in CC1 at the stitch that is as far from the end of the complete row as the short row is long. 

This blogpost was featured at the "Sew it, Craft it Cook it"-Link Party #11 at sewhistorically.com. Thank you!

Montag, 22. Mai 2017

Waterfall Tunic

I guess I've been watching too many sewing tutorials on the internet - without really being able to sew myself :/ ... something I really liked was the idea of a top with a waterfall or cowl neck.

So, I tried to create a pattern for myself using one of the great tutorials on the internet (linked below) and knitted the pieces all in stockinette stitch. So, here's a tutorial on how to do something similar for yourself. Since I used bulky yarn, this was a very quick knit for me - it only took me four days to knit the two pieces and - after blocking - one afternoon to sew it and to weave in the ends.

This sleeveless tunic is knitted in plain stockinette stitch. It is shaped to suit your body and has an elegant waterfall neck. It is knitted in two pieces (front and back) from bottom to top.


It is NOT a stitch-by-stitch knitting pattern for various sizes. It is rather a tutorial how to contruct and knit a similar tunic - and of course you don't have to use bulky yarn but can use other yarn weights as well. I will give you my numbers and calculations as an example written in purple.





Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Materials
  • 300 to 400 grams of bulky weight cotton yarn (for my size I used a little over 300 grams - about 425 meters of yarn)
  • 8 mm needles (the yarn label asked for 5.5 - 6 mm needles, but since I wanted the fabric to be very loose I chose bigger needles)
  • 2 stitch markers
  • a tapestry needle to weave in ends and to sew the pieces together

Useful Techniques and Abbreviations
  • How to make a cowl top pattern (for sewing): see this YouTube video by IzzyMEIMsaab.
  • Make One Knit-Stitches (here's a video by PurlSoho that shows these stitches)
    • mk1l (left-leaning): pick up the bar from front to back and knit it through the back loop
    • mk1r (right-leaning): pick up the bar from back to front and knit it through the front loop
  • Make One Purl-Stitches (here's a video by KnitPurlHunter that shows these stitches)
    • mk1p right-leaning (mk1pl, i.e. right-leaning effect on RS): make one purl stitch by inserting the left-hand needle from the back in the bar between the two stitches and purl through the front of the loop
    • mk1p left-leaning (mk1pr, i.e. left-leaning effect on RS): make one purl stitch by inserting the left-hand needle from the back in the bar between the two stitches and purl through the back of the loop
  • Mattress stitch to create an invisible seam between two stockinette pieces: see this YouTube video by iknitwithcatfur
  • How to knit shoulder seams: see this YouTube video by knitpurlhunter.


Measuring and Swatching

I created a pattern on paper (any broadsheet newspaper will do) using the method shown in IzziMEIMsaab's video). But it will be OK if you just take the measurements listed below.
Note: For me it's difficult to take measurements from my body - that's why I generally use a top that fits me well to take measurements.

Here's an outline of the pattern with all the necessary measurements (since this was inspired by sewing videos, the measurements are shown on the fold, i.e. half of the piece).

You need to measure:
A = from your hips to your waist
B = from your waist to your bust
C = from your bust to under your arm
D = A + B + C = from your hips to under your arm
E = from the shoulder to under your arms
F = one quarter (1/4) of your hip circumference
G = one quarter (1/4) of your waist circumference
H = one quarter (1/4) of your bust circumference
I  = one quarter (1/4) of your underarm circumference
J = shoulder seam
Kback = half of your neck width

Drape your measuring tape from shoulder to shoulder around your neck to see how deep you want your neckline to fall (see IzziMEIMsaab's video at minute 1:44). Then see how many cm this is on your measuring tape. Kfront is half of that measurement.

Knit a swatch! And block it.
Then carefully count your stitches and rows and calculate the numbers of the measurements you've taken.

My swatch gave the following numbers: 10 cm = 10.5 sts in width and 10 cm = 16 rows in height. Then I calculated:
A = 27 cm => 2.7 x 16 = 43.2 => 43 rows
B = 11 cm => 1.1 x 16 = 17,6 => 18 rows
C = 5 cm => 0.5 x 16 = 8 => 8 rows
D = A + B + C => 69 rows
E = 22 cm => 2.2 x 16 = 35,2 => 35 rows
F = 25 cm => 2.5 x 10.5 = 26.25 => 26 sts
G = 19 cm => 1.9 x 10.5 = 19.95 => 20 sts
H = 23 cm =>  2.3 x 10.5 = 24.15 => 24 sts
I = 22 cm => 2.2 x 10.5= 23.1 => 23 sts
J = 12 cm => 1.2 x 10.5 = 12.6 => 13 sts
Kback = 9 cm => 0.9 x 10.5 => 9.45 => 10 sts
Kfront = 21 cm => 2.1 x 10.5= 22.05 => 22 sts


Instructions

Back piece

Hip to Waist
CO twice the stitches you've calculated for F plus 2 edge stitches (in my case 2x26 + 2 = 54).
Then knit in plain stockinette up to your waist while decreasing at the sides:

Normal row (RS): sl1, k to end
Normal row (WS): sl1, p to end
Decrease row (RS): sl1, ssk, k to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1
Decrease row (WS): sl1, p2tog, p to last 3 sts, p2togtbl, p1

Calculate the decreases you need for a shaped waist per side: F-G.  (I had to decrease 6 sts per side (F-G => 26-20 = 6) over 43 rows. I only wanted to decrease on RS, so I chose to knit normal rows, and then I knitted one decrease row instead of every 6th normal row.)

Waist to Bust
From the waist up to your bust, you want to increase, i.e. to knit normal rows as well as increasing rows. For this you want to calculate the number of stitches per side that you need to increase (H-G) over the rows you calculated for B. (I had to decrease 4 sts (H-G=24-20 = 4) over 18 rows (B).)

Increase row (RS): sl1, mk1l, k to last 2 sts, mk1r, k1
Increase row (WS): sl1, mk1p, p to last 2 sts, mk1p, p1

Bust to Armhole
From your bust line to the arm hole you'll want to decrease again. Here you need to calculate the number of stitches to decrease per side (I-H) over C rows. The decrease rows are the same as listed above. (I had to decrease only 1 sts (I-H = 24-23=1) per side over 8 rows.)

Armhole to Shoulder
If you're shoulder measurement (J+Kback) is narrower or wider than your underarm measurement (I) you also need to knit increase or decrease rows over the next E rows. In my case I didn't have to decrease (J+Kback-I = 13+10-23=0)).

When you've finished these last rows. Bind off.
The back piece is finished.



Front piece

Hip to Armhole
From the waist up to the armhole the front piece is knitted exactly as your back piece. So knit this exactly as your back piece up to the last row.
During the last row put in two stitchmarkers: look at the stitch number you calculated for your shoulder measurement (J, 13 sts in my case) and put the first stitchmarker J sts away from the beginning of the row, and the second stitch marker J sts away from the end of the row.



Armhole to shoulder
Now you need to calculate the increases per side for the waterfall neckline. This is the difference between Kback  and Kfront, i.e. Kfront-Kback (in my case: 22-10=12). These increases have to be distributed evenly over the number of rows you calculated for E (in my case over 36 rows; 36 / 12 = 3, this means I had to increase every 3rd row).

Neck Increase Row (RS): sl1, k to marker, mk1r, k to next marker, mk1l, k to end
Neck Increase Row (WS): sl1, p to marker, mk1pl, p to next marker, mk1pr, p to end

Alternate neck increase rows as calculated with normal (stockinette) rows until you've knitted the rows you calculated for E. Then bind off. Now your front piece is finished, too.

Finishing

I blocked both piece to size and then sewed them at the sides and the shoulders. I used the techniques linked above (mattress stitch & invisible seam).


This post was featured on OuiCrochet's Fiber Tuesday Link Party #115 and at the New Tuesday Pin-spiration Link Party.. Thank you!
Oui Crochet    Tuesday Pin-spiration Link Party

Samstag, 20. Mai 2017

Knitted Monster Fridge Magnet

The idea for this little project actually came when I received a new catalogue from a food delivery service. Their catalogue is quite big and on its back there is a glued on magnet so that you can just put it on your fridge. I didn't like the idea to just throw the magnet away, so I started asking myself what I could do with it ... and - not really surprising - I liked the idea of doing something in knitting :) I furthermore decided to only use materials that I had already at home, i.e. to make this a real recycling project.

Knitted Monster Fridge Magnet - free knitting pattern

Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.




Materials
  • magnets (I used one rescued from a delivery catalogue) 
  • knitting needles and scrap yarn to knit the surface - if you don't like knitting you can also use a small piece of fabric
  • embroidery thread or other yarn to stitch the face
  • embroidery needle
  • 1 to 3 button(s) for the eye(s)
  • a piece of cardboard stock (this can be old packaging - it will not be visible)
  • a piece of scrap paper
  • glue (I used normal craft glue and superglue) 
Knitted Monster Fridge Magnet - free knitting pattern


Instructions
  • Knit a small square (about 7cm x 7cm) with any yarn of your choice - I knitted it in plain stockinette stitch. The edges will roll in, but that won't matter because the edges will be hidden at the back of the monster. Don't weave in the ends - rather you can use them to draw the edges tight later. 
  • On a piece of paper doodle a few monsters to scale and decide upon a design (photo 1).
  • Copy that design on a piece of cardboard stock and cut out both the cardboard and the paper (photo 2).
  • With your embroidery needle stitch through the paper to mark where the facial features should be (photo 3). Then glue paper to the WS of your knitted square (photo 4).
Knitted Monster Fridge Magnet
  • Stitch the face on with embroidery thread and sew on the button(s). If you're design changes a bit while you're stitching - that's fine, too (photo 5).
  • Then glue the cardboard monster to the back of paper.
  • Fold a piece of leftover cardboard to get a higher block and glue it to the back of the monster. This will give your monster some body - it'll get a bit convex when you draw the sides in and you'll need something to glue your magnet to.
  • Thread the tail of your knitting into the embroidery needle, stitch around the edges of the piece and draw the sides in (photo 6). Make sure that the outline of your monster looks smooth.
  • With superglue, glue magnet to the back of your monster - finished!
Knitted Monster Fridge Magnet - free knitting pattern

Knitted Monster Fridge Magnet - free knitting pattern